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Import vehicles into Djibouti and Eastern Africa

Import vehicles into Djibouti and Eastern Africa

Please note that   DONGTE-- DTA  manufactuer exporter to Africa   . People may find it daunting to export to  Djibouti and Eastern Africa  but not with  DTA. Email us now at tomking@dtatruck.com and discover the DTA difference.  DTA is known for its superior  integrity, great customer service, great prices, great selection, great quality and great speed of delivery.

The founder members of the East African Community Customs Union are Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. In December 2006, Burundi and Rwanda were admitted into the Union. Members of COMESA are Angola, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Finally, South African Development Community (SADC) is comprised of Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The majority of our exports to  Africa are going to Maputo ,Durban ,DAR ES SALAAM, MOMBASA  , Port Louis, TamataVe,WalVis Bay,Pointe Noire, Luanda, Lome,Matadi, Owendo, LIBREVILLE, Bata, Malabo, Duala,  Lagos, Cotonou, Conakry,Tema, Dakar,Namibe based dealers who buy it for their customers in different parts of South and East ,west Africa www.dtatruck.com www.szdtruck.com  tomking@dtatruck.com

Eastern Africa includes Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, Zambia, Burundi, Rwanda, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Sudan. Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Malawi, and Zambia are Right Hand Drive countries while Burundi, Rwanda, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia and Sudan are Left Hand Drive countries. Malawi and Zambia are sometimes counted among Southern African countries as well and are a part of South African Regional organizations as well. We serve Tanzania from Dar-es-Salaam port and Kenya from Mombasa port. Ugandan Burundi and Rwandan buyers prefer Mombasa but can also route via Dar-es-Salaam. Malawians buyers have choice between Mombasa, Dar-es-Salaam and Durban.  All the other countries have their own ports but our shipment to Southern Sudan are often routed via Mombasa.
 

The founder members of the East African Community Customs Union are Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. In December 2006, Burundi and Rwanda were admitted into the Union. Members of COMESA are Angola, Burundi, Comoros, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Finally, South African Development Community (SADC) is comprised of Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Djibouti

Thailand top new and used car 4x4 vigo triton exporter to Djiboutidjibouti's and East Africa's top car importer exporterDjibouti (formerly known as French Somaliland and then as the Territory of the Afars and the Issas) is situated on the east coast of Africa along the Bab al-Mandab, the strait that links the Red Sea with the Gulf of Aden. It is bordered by Eritrea to the N, Ethiopia N, W, and S, by Somalia on the SE, and by the Bab al-Mandab, Gulf of Tadjoura, and Gulf of Aden on the E. Djibouti encompasses approximately 22,000 sq km (8,494 sq mi) and has a total boundary length of 830 km (516 mi), which includes a coastline of 314 km (195 mi). Comparatively, the area occupied by Djibouti is slightly smaller than the state of Massachusetts.

The Republic of Djibouti is situated in the Horn of Africa on Africa’s east coast, bordered to the north by Eritrea, to the west by Ethiopia, to the south by Somalia, and to the east by the Gulf of Aden. Djibouti covers 8,400 square miles (21,883 square kilometers) and is about the size of Massachusetts. The country is shaped like a “C” surrounding the Gulf of Tadjoura, an inlet off the Gulf of Aden. Along with Eritrea and Yemen, Djibouti shares direct access to the strategic Bab el Mandeb, the “Gate of Tears,” which controls southern access to the Red Sea.

Djibouti’s capital, also called Djibouti, is a relative oasis in an area of dry watersheds composed of harsh, stony desert and low, barren hills. The capital is at sea level and mostly surrounded by water, affording sea views from much of the city. In addition to Djibouti City, Djibouti has five provincial capitals: Ali Sabieh and Dikhil in the interior to the south and west, and Arta, Tadjoura and Obock on the west and north coasts of the Gulf of Tadjoura.

The landscape beyond the capital, though largely barren, is quite strange and impressive. Beyond the Gulf of Tadjoura via a narrow strait is the Ghoubet, a deep body of blue water with two striking volcanic islands. The coastline north of the Gulf of Tadjoura juxtaposes palm-lined beaches with jagged hills. In the north a large high desert region rises to Mount Moussa Ali, the highest point in Djibouti (3,600 feet). Also to the north is the Forêt du Day, a national park on Mount Goda. In this last vestige of a forest that once covered the area are several rare plants and animals, including monkeys and antelope. Lake Assal, a unique natural phenomenon over 500 feet below sea level, is 80 miles west of Djibouti City. A lake ten times saltier than the ocean, Lake Assal is an ethereal blue and surrounded by picturesque volcanic hills. It is the lowest body of water in Africa and the second lowest on Earth. Farther into the countryside to the southwest lies Lake Abbe, a large salt lake bisected by the Djibouti-Ethiopia border.

No restrictions are placed on the age, color, or make of automobiles that may be brought into Djibouti. The vehicle must be Left Hand Drive though. Djibouti's import duties average ??  per cent and range from a low of 2 per cent to a high of 32 per cent.  Djibouti also applies other duties and charges such as /service centers in Bissau, although service and parts availability for those models are patchy. Maintenance and repair facilities are limited both in expertise and availability of parts.

Leaded gasoline and diesel fuel are reliably available in the capital and generally available in country’s interior. Because octane ratings are not high, the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Unleaded gasoline is not available, so catalytic converters should be removed before shipping vehicles to Guinea-Bissau. Although diesel fuel and leaded gasoline cost roughly the same amount, better fuel efficiency makes diesel engines more economical and a better choice for up-country travel. Fuel theft is not uncommon, so a lockable gas cap is highly recommended.

Undercoating, undercarriage protection, heavy-duty suspensions, and off-road packages are practical options for Djibouti. Tubeless tires can be repaired in the capital city, but inner tubes are recommended for up-country travel. Spare parts can be hard to find. Include in your household effects a good supply of belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, headlights, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, a distributor, a condenser, and tires. For up-country travel, bring emergency equipment, such as a strong jack, spare tires, tire pumps, jumper cables, winch or tow ropes, first-aid kit, and racks.

When traveling outside the capital city, four-wheeled drive vehicles are advised because the roads are in disrepair. During the rainy season, many upcountry roads become impassable.

Djibouti does not have many paved roads, including those in the capital city. The remainder is constructed of lateritic soils. These roads are often rough, and in poorly drained areas become impassable quagmires during the 6-month rainy season. In addition, the coastal salt air attacks car finishes, radiators, air-conditioning systems, and the chassis. For these reasons, simple, rugged automobiles, rust proofed and undercoated, and with good ground clearance are recommended.

Heavy-duty springs and shock absorbers are mandatory for up-country travel, as is air-conditioning to provide relief from heat, humidity, and dust. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended. Unleaded gas is not available in Djibouti. Catalytic converters must be removed before shipment or after arrival here.

Four-wheel drive vehicles is preferred although regular sedans are adequate for driving on Djibouti City’s mostly paved roads. High ground clearance and four-wheel drive are necessary for trips to beaches or into the interior. Four-wheel drive is also useful for in-town driving after rains, which generally cause some flooding of roads. Light colored vehicles are recommended to deflect Djibouti’s intense sunlight.

Unleaded gasoline is available in Djibouti. Diesel fuel is less expensive than gasoline; both are available in the capital, but only diesel is available in the interior. Gasoline is not high octane, so the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Since 2004 there has been no importation of leaded gasoline into the country. Unleaded is 91 octane.

Djibouti’s salty and often humid air is highly corrosive, making rustproofing and undercoating highly recommended. Off-road packages or heavy-duty suspensions are also practical options. Traffic in Djibouti moves on the right (American) side of the road.

Many Japanese makes (Toyota, Isuzu, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Daihatsu, and Suzuki), as well as Peugeot, have representatives in Djibouti. No American manufacturers are represented. Competent mechanics can be found, although quality of service varies and spare parts for even the most common makes and models are not readily available so we recommend that you order most used spare parts along with the vehicle. Labor and parts are expensive. Mechanics are most familiar with Japanese and American makes.

You should order belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, and a foot or electric tire pump along with your vehicle. Emergency equipment, such as spare tires, jacks, repair kits, and tow ropes, is recommended for out-of-town trips. Jerry cans and racks are useful for bringing gasoline and water on trips into the interior.

 

Many roads between major towns are unpaved, but paved roads do extend from Kigali to the Uganda border via Byumba in the north; from Kigali to Rusumu on the Tanzanian border in the southeast; between Kigali and Gisenyi and Ruhengeri in the northwest; and between Kigali and the Burundi border via Butare in the south. Traffic moves on the right in Rwanda, Burundi and Congo; on the left in Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya. Within Rwanda there are 12,000 km. of roads; at the end of the first quarter of 2004, some 1,000 km. are paved.

Djibouti Duties

Formerly a "Free Zone," although the term only applied to the port, Djibouti now levies customs duties on most commodities, with most import taxes ranging from 5–40%. Luxury goods, such as cigarettes and alcoholic beverages, are taxed at higher rates, as much as 160%. Additionally, Djibouti requires import licenses for all those wishing to import or sell in the country.

Djibouti Port used by Djibouti and Ethiopia

Djibouti Port has 3,219 meters of quays. Since June 2000, Dubai Port International has managed Djibouti Port. Djibouti Port has a capacity of 6 - 8 million tons per year. Port also has capacity to handle 3 million tons of container traffic.

Port operates on 3 shifts of 8 hours each, with a one-hour break between shifts. For bulk vessel operations, port can readily handle 3,000 tons of bulk cargo per day per vessel. With several vessels worked, discharge rates in excess of 6,000 tons per day are possible.

During peak periods, Port Authority monitors vessel performance. Poorly performing vessel can be shifted to alternate berths or removed to anchorage. There are plans to construct a bulk-handling facility with work recently started.
The general cargo sheds are adequately equipped. Several stevedoring firms own and operate stevedoring equipment including gantry cranes, forklifts, tractors and trailers. Only companies that are wholly Djibouti owned are allowed to operate vessel stevedoring services.

Shipping lines offers 15 to 30 day's free time, after which demurrage applies. Port offers 30 days free time after which container is moved to Inland Free Port area where storage charges apply. Due to space limitations and demands on container handling equipment, only limited number containers can be stripped at port for despatch to Ethiopia. Where many containers are expected (say in excess of 50 boxes), arrangements can be made with port to block stack these containers. Stripping inside Ethiopia requires ETH Customs confirmation that box has been re-exported out of Ethiopia. Good coordination with transporters key to ensuring boxes are returned to Djibouti. Containers typically have payloads in excess of 20 Mtn. Transport of a large number of containers to Ethiopia requires enough draw bar type trucks that can move 2 TEU of 20 MT each.

Increase in tariff at Djibouti Port

There will be a new set of tariff rates to be applied to all services at the Port of Djibouti, beginning mid-August 2008, DP World Djibouti announced. Communicated to the Ethiopian authorities through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, who were caught off guard, and so completely taken aback by this development, various sources revealed.

The new rates would introduce increases of up to 25pc in marine charges; an average of 2,000 ships dock at the Port of Djibouti every year. Other increases include cargo port dues, storage charges (25pc), and a 15pc rise in the cost of container stevedoring by the latter for the first time since 1984, disclosed a letter signed by Aboubaker Omar Hadi, commercial director of DP World Djibouti, on June 25, 2008.

This will be the first comprehensive adjustment of tariff on port operations since Ethiopia and Djibouti signed a port utilization agreement in May 2004. The port’s management was given to DP World in 2000, under a 20-year contract. The current increase in various forms of port dues is attributed to a global escalation of prices on fuel, which increased by 350pc, and a headline inflation of 19.2pc in Djibouti, the letter stated.

The management decided to reduce the free storage period for local cargo from 10 to three days and on that of transit cargo (mostly to Ethiopia) from two weeks to eight days. The management has also introduced a new fee of one dollar whenever a gate pass is issued.

The Port is not only used as a gateway for Ethiopian transit cargo, but also as a point of destination, according to a study conducted by the Ministry in November 2004. The volume of its import and export cargoes has been on the rise: from 3.9 million tonnes in 2006/07 to 4.6 million tonnes in 2007/08. Projected to grow by 20pc, the volume is anticipated to exceed five million tonnes this year.

Last time, the port attempted to increase its tariff in January 2001 by 30pc, Ethiopian authorities protested vehemently, for it would have had subjected the country to an additional cost of nearly 170 million dollars.

How much the latest increase will cost Ethiopia is a question that trade and transport experts were pondering last week. A technical committee under the auspices of the Ministry of Trade and Industry (MoTI) was formed last week. It comprises members from four federal agencies: the Ministry, Customs Authority, Maritime Transit Enterprise (MTS) and the Ethiopian Shipping Lines (ESL).

Ethiopia uses 90 percent of Djibouti port’s services and relies nearly 100% on the port for imports. It is to be recalled that the Port of Djibouti had introduced an increment in 2001, after negotiations with the Ethiopian government.

Ethiopia’s import traffic via Djibouti port has been regularly increasing. Over 3.9 million metric tons of goods were imported in the year 1998 E.C. The volume increased to over 4.6 million metric tons in 1999 E.C.

According to a report from ENA, Ethiopia’s import via the Port of Djibouti increased by 20% in March this year, quoting the Ethiopian Ambassador to Djibouti, Ato Shemsedin Ahmed Roble. Relief grain import has decreased while construction materials and goods related to investment and infrastructure development have significantly increased lately.

However, in view of the current drought this situation may reverse. The new increment when applied will concern all port users, including vessels, operators, charters, mortgagees or agents, the cargo owners or agents (shippers), and other users of the port.

Djibouti Port Commercial Director, Aboubacar O. Hadi had explained that port charges on import represent only 1.6% of the total value of goods and on export the charges represent only 0.78%. In view of the continuous upgrading undertaken by the Port, and the hike in petrol price, over USD 145/barrel and rising, increments in the port charges were inevitable, note observers.

In 2007, Ethiopian imports were at 5 billion dollars and exports were 1.2 billion dollars worth. The port charge increment would incur millions in additional costs for Ethiopia.

The port of Djibouti had total traffic of 7.4 million metric tons in 2007, a 36% increase from the 5.4 million metric tons in 2006. The transshipment traffic has also been growing rapidly. Ethiopia and Djibouti combined represent 120,000 container imports, while transshipment alone is 50,000 containers.

The Port is also expecting to increase its transshipment business starting from next year with the Port of Doraleh. After completion in December 2008, the Port of Doraleh expects to service in the first two years 1.5 million containers per year. Later, it is expected to handle 2 million containers.

Port storage

Port authority owns 19 warehouses within the port area, of which three are in the extension of the free trade zone, totalling some 47,380 sq. meters with a storage capacity of 672,440 metric tons per year (for 45 days turn around). Approximately thirteen hectares of open storage is provided in the port or 130,300 square meters with a capacity of 1.850 million metric tons per annum. There are in addition 13.5 hectares at the container terminal which can accommodate 5,130 TEUs at a time or more than 120,000 TEUs per annum (with 15 days turn around) which is equivalent to 1 million tons of cargo per year. Port storage - if available - is free for first 30 days. Quayside storage is possible. Most berths, transit shed, warehouses and open storage areas are served by rail. Each of the general cargo berths and the coastal cargo berth has a transit shed ranging between 1,080 to 4,900 square meters.

Regional Agreements

The Common Market for East and Southern Africa

The Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA) has been operating, in one form or another, since 1981.  COMESA aims to promote economic integration via the removal of barriers to trade and investment among COMESA member states. Moreover, COMESA aims to advocate for infrastructure development, and development in science and technology. Economic integration is envisaged to progress from the Free Trade Area (FTA) to an economic monetary union. The FTA became operational on 1st November 2000 with nine participating countries initially. The nine member countries that are implementing zero tariffs are Egypt, Sudan, Djibouti, Malawi, Madagascar, Mauritius, Zambia and Zimbabwe.  However in January 2004, Burundi and Rwanda joined the FTA, bringing the total number of participating countries to eleven.  

The COMESA FTA is an agreement among members not to apply customs duties or charges on goods traded amongst themselves.  The eligible goods for duty-free treatment must meet the agreed upon Rules of Origin.  Members also agree to eliminate all non-tariff barriers to trade between them.

A COMSEA Certificate of Origin is required for each consignment of goods and is obtained from the Revenue Authority in respective member countries. 

The Southern Africa Development Community

The Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) aims to promote regional integration and sustainable development in the regional community.

Members of the Southern African Development Community (SADC), comprising 14 countries, signed a Trade Protocol, which calls for the implementation of a Free Trade Area.  Each country has negotiated two reduced tariff schedules.  One schedule is applicable only for South Africa, and another schedule for all other SADC members. Zambia's implementation of her offer, effective 30th April 2001, is provided to those countries that provide Zambia with the SADC reduced tariff schedule. 

The reduction of tariffs to South Africa provide for delayed liberalization, while the schedule to other members provide for broader and faster access to the South Africa market.  The tariff schedule applicable to SADC members, with the exception of South Africa, has three categories.  Category A products are those products which go to zero-duty immediately upon implementation.  The tariff for Category B products gradually goes down to zero-duty over a period of eight years, and the tariff of Category C products reaches zero-duty twelve years after implementation.  Category C products are known as sensitive products, and include for Zambia meat and dairy products, tea, some flours, raw sugar, cement, textiles and clothing, and motor vehicles.

Plans are currently underway to establish a Free Trade Agreement by 2008, and a SADC Customs Union by 2010.

A SADC Certificate of Origin is required for each consignment of goods and is obtained from the Revenue Authority. 

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Burundi

Burundi is a landlocked country in east-central Africa with an area of 27,830 sq km (10,745 sq mi), of which about 7% consists of lakes. Comparatively, the area occupied by Burundi is slightly smaller than the state of Maryland. It extends 263 km (163 mi) NNE–SSW and 194 km (121 mi) ESE–WNW. Burundi is bounded on the N by Rwanda, on the E and S by Tanzania, and on the W by the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DROC), with a total boundary length of 974 km (605 mi).

Burundi Vehicle Information

Burundi’s rudimentary public transportation system makes a dependable personally owned vehicle a necessity. Burundi, Rwanda, and Zaire use left-hand drive vehicles, but right-hand drive vehicles are permitted. A valid driver license is the only requirement of obtaining a license to drive in Burundi. Post personnel may import one duty-free vehicle per family. Predominant types of vehicles include Toyota, Nissan, Peugeot, Renault Suzuki, Mitsubishi, Mercedes, Volkswagon, Land or Range Rovers, and Hyundai. Regular gasoline costs about $2.75 a gallon, and there is no unleaded diesel readily available.

Purchasing a vehicle locally is much more expensive than in the U.S. The primary factor in choosing a vehicle is availability of service and spare parts. Peugeot and Toyota probably offer the best prospects for spare parts availability. Secondary factors include durability, high ground clearance for rough roads, and resale value. Manual transmission is highly recommended, as parts and trained service personnel are virtually nonexistent for automatic transmissions.

Cars should be equipped with heavy-duty suspension, cooling systems, and batteries, and tube-type tires. Air-conditioning is a welcome feature, but not essential. Ship an adequate supply of oil, gas, and air filters; oil, brake and transmission fluids; fan belts, windshield wipers, spark plugs and bulbs and fuses. This will simplify maintenance and reduce costs.

Local resale value is higher than in the U.S., except for vehicles with automatic transmission. Resale premiums are higher for makes listed above and for four-door versus two-door models.

Aside from the usual documents (registration, serial number, etc.) owner’s original purchase price documentation is especially important both for initial entry through customs and for local resale requirements. Customs clearance requires a horsepower rating. Do not include CB radio or any other transmitter in the car. Burundi customs procedures may take longer than many other posts, so send ahead documents and one set of keys as early as possible.

Some employees bring used American makes with extra spare parts and have no serious problems. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are popular in Burundi, as they provide off-road capability and high-ground clearance for rough roads.

Roads within Bujumbura range from bad to worse. However good, paved roads extend to Bukavu (Zaire) and Kigali (Rwanda). Within the country, good, paved roads extend to Gitega, Source du Nil, Nyanza Lac, Muramvya, Kayanza, and Ngozi. Other roads are unpaved, but passable.

Rwanda

Thailand top new and used car 4x4 vigo triton exporter to RwandaRwanda, a landlocked country in east-central Africa, has an area of 26,338 sq km (10,170 sq mi), extending 248 km (154 mi) NE– SW and 166 km (103 mi) SE–NW. Comparatively, the area occupied by Rwanda is slightly smaller than the state of Maryland. It is bordered on the N by Uganda, on the E by Tanzania, on the S by Burundi, and on the W and NW by the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DROC—the former Zaire), with a total boundary length of 893 km (555 mi).

Rwanda is the most densely populated country on the continent. The capital, Kigali, is a small city located in the heart of the country. Despite its proximity to the Equator, Kigali's altitude of approximately 4,800 feet ensures a temperate climate throughout the year.

The Republic of Rwanda is located along the Great Rift Valley in the mountains of east central Africa and covers 10,169 square miles, 4,587 sq. miles of which is water. Slightly smaller than the state of Maryland, Rwanda is circular in shape. The eastern boundary is shared with Tanzania; Uganda lies to the north; the west borders the Democratic Republic of Congo (formerly Zaire) and Lake Kivu; Burundi lies to the south. The western edge of the country along the Congo/Nile watershed rises steeply, formed by a chain of volcanoes called the Virunga Mountains. It is here that the country's highest point, the volcano Karisimbi at an elevation of 14,782 feet, is found. Gisenyi, a town at the northern end of Lake Kivu, enjoys spectacular vistas of the surrounding volcanoes. Rwanda’s green valleys produce beans, sorghum, corn, manioc, Irish potatoes, rice, sweet potatoes, soybeans, bananas, coffee, and tea.

Rwanda's import duties average ??  per cent and range from a low of 2 per cent to a high of 32 per cent.  Rwanda also applies other duties and charges such as /service centers in Bissau, although service and parts availability for those models are patchy. Maintenance and repair facilities are limited both in expertise and availability of parts.

Leaded gasoline and diesel fuel are reliably available in the capital and generally available in country’s interior. Because octane ratings are not high, the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Unleaded gasoline is not available, so catalytic converters should be removed before shipping vehicles to Guinea-Bissau. Although diesel fuel and leaded gasoline cost roughly the same amount, better fuel efficiency makes diesel engines more economical and a better choice for up-country travel. Fuel theft is not uncommon, so a lockable gas cap is highly recommended.

Undercoating, undercarriage protection, heavy-duty suspensions, and off-road packages are practical options for Rwanda. Tubeless tires can be repaired in the capital city, but inner tubes are recommended for up-country travel. Spare parts can be hard to find. Include in your household effects a good supply of belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, headlights, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, a distributor, a condenser, and tires. For up-country travel, bring emergency equipment, such as a strong jack, spare tires, tire pumps, jumper cables, winch or tow ropes, first-aid kit, and racks.

When traveling outside the capital city, four-wheeled drive vehicles are advised because the roads are in disrepair. During the rainy season, many upcountry roads become impassable.

Rwanda does not have many paved roads, including those in the capital city. The remainder is constructed of lateritic soils. These roads are often rough, and in poorly drained areas become impassable quagmires during the 6-month rainy season. In addition, the coastal salt air attacks car finishes, radiators, air-conditioning systems, and the chassis. For these reasons, simple, rugged automobiles, rust proofed and undercoated, and with good ground clearance are recommended.

Heavy-duty springs and shock absorbers are mandatory for up-country travel, as is air-conditioning to provide relief from heat, humidity, and dust. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended. Unleaded gas is not available in Rwanda. Catalytic converters must be removed before shipment or after arrival here.

Rwanda Duties

The tariff is Zambia's main trade policy instrument. Its simple average MFN tariff was almost 14% in 2000/01, down from almost 16% in 1997/98 and 21% in 1996/97.Virtually all tariffs are ad valorem. The tariff structure is escalatory, with six bands; rates of zero or 5% apply to "necessities" and of10% to intermediate goods. The maximum duty rate applied to consumer goods was 25% in 2001.

Import taxes

Rwanda has significantly liberalised its trade regime. In 1999, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF), tariffs ranged from 0% to 25%, and from 0% to 60% from 1995 to 1997. Consequently, the average tariff rate has declined from 31.9% in 1995 to 11.3% in 1999. The IMF reports that there are no significant non-tariff barriers and that, overall, Rwanda's progression in trade liberalisation has been faster than most sub-Saharan African countries. As a result of the drop in the tariff rate and the evidence that non-tariff barriers have been eliminated, Rwanda's trade policy score is 2 points better in 2001 as compared to 2000.

Consumption taxes

VAT applied on goods import :

  • Standard rate : The standard tax rate is 18% to all taxable goods and services.
     
  • Reduced rate : As for goods or services consumed by privileged persons, the VAT rate is fixed at 0%. This is meant to ensure that any VAT paid by those persons as part of the purchase price is refundable. Rwanda Revenue Authority refunds the VAT.

    The privileged persons include those with diplomatic status; it also includes those dealing in exports as well as donor-funded projects run under an agreement between the Government of Rwanda and the donor.

Rwanda Customs Regulation

Guidelines to suppliers

When exporting goods into Rwanda, there are formal governmental procedures to be taken into consideration. The following document will describe the procedures that have to be followed and it will also state what is required from the supplier at different stages. Unless the following guidelines are cautiously and timely followed up there will most certainly be delays in the shipment of goods which will consequently result into delays in clearance of the shipment and delivery to the final customer. Rwanda Revenue Authority consider GATT system for price evaluation for customs purposes to calculate duties and taxes.

Import Declaration Form - Module I

All commercial imports into Rwanda require an IDF. When the importer in Rwanda applies for an IDF, the information to be filled in the application is to be provided by the supplier vide a Proforma Invoice. Following information is required on the Proforma Invoice to facilitate accurate application of IDF.

A. Required from the supplier

  1. Specification and a clear description of the quantity and quality of the goods
  2. Free On Board (FOB) Value
  3. Freight Value (if applicable)
  4. Currency of Payment
  5. Mode of Transportation
  6. Goods Country of Origin
  7. Insurance Value (if applicable)

B.. Proforma Invoice for transport and insurance if not provided by the supplier.

Shipping Documents

Airfreight Shipments

original documents

  1. Air Way Bill
  2. Supplier Invoice(s)
  3. Packing List
  4. IDF (from the Importer)
  5. Importer’s TIN and VAT numbers
  6. Duties and Taxes Exemption Certificates, if any
  7. National Drug Authority Certificate / Permit for import of drug and pharmaceuticals

Seafreight Shipments original documents

  1. Bill of Lading
  2. Supplier Invoice(s)
  3. Packing List IDF (from the Importer)
  4. IDF (from the Importer)
  5. Importer’s TIN and VAT numbers
  6. Duties and Taxes Exemption Certificates, if any
  7. National Drug Authority Certificate/Permit for import of drug and pharmaceuticals

Additional Documents required for specific imports, as below

  1. Phyto Sanitary certificates for import of agricultural products.
  2. Registration / De-registration Card of country of origin of old/used vehicles
  3. Gift Certificates, if gifted to any organization eligible for duty free clearance
  4. Passport of the individual for clearance of personal effects
  5. Certificate of Origin - especially for goods imported from COMESA countries

Imports which are prohibited or restricted

Prohibited Imports

  1. Fire arms
  2. Post office equipment
  3. Electricity supply specialized equipment
  4. Pornographic materials
  5. Imports banned under international agreement where Rwanda is a signatory
  6. Cosmetics products and Soaps
    • containing any mercury or mercury salt
    • containing more than 2% of hydroquinone
    • of which the packing does not specify all ingredients

 

Restricted Imports

  1. Drugs
  2. Live animals
  3. Wild endangered species
  4. Explosives
  5. Military hardware
  6. Specialized communication equipment

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Eritrea

Thailand top new and used car 4x4 vigo triton exporter to EritreaEritrea is located in eastern Africa. The area occupied by Eritrea is slightly larger than the state of Pennsylvania with a total area of 121,320 sq km (46,842 sq mi). Eritrea shares boundaries with the Red Sea on the NE, Djibouti on the SE, Ethiopia on the S, and Sudan on the W, and has a total land boundary of 1,626 km (1,010 mi) and a coastline of 2,234 km (1,388 mi).

No restrictions are placed on the age, color, or make of automobiles that may be brought into Djibouti. The vehicle must be Left Hand Drive though. Djibouti's import duties average ??  per cent and range from a low of 2 per cent to a high of 32 per cent.  Djibouti also applies other duties and charges such as /service centers in Bissau, although service and parts availability for those models are patchy. Maintenance and repair facilities are limited both in expertise and availability of parts.

Leaded gasoline and diesel fuel are reliably available in the capital and generally available in country’s interior. Because octane ratings are not high, the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Unleaded gasoline is not available, so catalytic converters should be removed before shipping vehicles to Guinea-Bissau. Although diesel fuel and leaded gasoline cost roughly the same amount, better fuel efficiency makes diesel engines more economical and a better choice for up-country travel. Fuel theft is not uncommon, so a lockable gas cap is highly recommended.

Undercoating, undercarriage protection, heavy-duty suspensions, and off-road packages are practical options for Eritrea. Tubeless tires can be repaired in the capital city, but inner tubes are recommended for up-country travel. Spare parts can be hard to find. Include in your household effects a good supply of belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, headlights, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, a distributor, a condenser, and tires. For up-country travel, bring emergency equipment, such as a strong jack, spare tires, tire pumps, jumper cables, winch or tow ropes, first-aid kit, and racks.

When traveling outside the capital city, four-wheeled drive vehicles are advised because the roads are in disrepair. During the rainy season, many upcountry roads become impassable.

Eritrea does not have many paved roads, including those in the capital city. The remainder is constructed of lateritic soils. These roads are often rough, and in poorly drained areas become impassable quagmires during the 6-month rainy season. In addition, the coastal salt air attacks car finishes, radiators, air-conditioning systems, and the chassis. For these reasons, simple, rugged automobiles, rust proofed and undercoated, and with good ground clearance are recommended.

Heavy-duty springs and shock absorbers are mandatory for up-country travel, as is air-conditioning to provide relief from heat, humidity, and dust. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended. Unleaded gas is not available in Eritrea. Catalytic converters must be removed before shipment or after arrival here.Four-wheel drive vehicles is preferred although regular sedans are adequate for driving on Djibouti City’s mostly paved roads. High ground clearance and four-wheel drive are necessary for trips to beaches or into the interior. Four-wheel drive is also useful for in-town driving after rains, which generally cause some flooding of roads. Light colored vehicles are recommended to deflect Djibouti’s intense sunlight.

Unleaded gasoline is available in Djibouti. Diesel fuel is less expensive than gasoline; both are available in the capital, but only diesel is available in the interior. Gasoline is not high octane, so the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Since 2004 there has been no importation of leaded gasoline into the country. Unleaded is 91 octane.

Djibouti’s salty and often humid air is highly corrosive, making rustproofing and undercoating highly recommended. Off-road packages or heavy-duty suspensions are also practical options. Traffic in Djibouti moves on the right (American) side of the road.

Many Japanese makes (Toyota, Isuzu, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Daihatsu, and Suzuki), as well as Peugeot, have representatives in Djibouti. No American manufacturers are represented. Competent mechanics can be found, although quality of service varies and spare parts for even the most common makes and models are not readily available so we recommend that you order most used spare parts along with the vehicle. Labor and parts are expensive. Mechanics are most familiar with Japanese and American makes.

You should order belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, and a foot or electric tire pump along with your vehicle. Emergency equipment, such as spare tires, jacks, repair kits, and tow ropes, is recommended for out-of-town trips. Jerry cans and racks are useful for bringing gasoline and water on trips into the interior.

A standard economy car is adequate for Asmara and main paved roads. Any real exploration of the countryside, however, requires a four-wheel-drive with good clearance. Air-conditioning is not needed in Asmara, but is important for lowland travel. European and Japanese cars prevail; repair services exist, but the right spare parts cannot always be found. Diesel fuel and regular gasoline are available, but there is no high-octane or unleaded gasoline in the country.

Eritrea Custom Duties

You cannot import a vehicle older than 10 years old. Eritrea is planning an ambitious but much needed tax and customs reform, which would, among other aims, reduce the number of tariff rates from 12 to three, and lower the maximum tariff from 200% to 25%. Customs duties on capital goods and raw materials will increase from 2% to 5% and excise taxes on luxury goods will be abolished. Custom Duty on cars is around 200% but that may come down to 25% if the new reforms are enacted.

Djibouti Port used by Djibouti and Ethiopia

Djibouti Port has 3,219 meters of quays. Since June 2000, Dubai Port International has managed Djibouti Port. Djibouti Port has a capacity of 6 - 8 million tons per year. Port also has capacity to handle 3 million tons of container traffic.

Port operates on 3 shifts of 8 hours each, with a one-hour break between shifts. For bulk vessel operations, port can readily handle 3,000 tons of bulk cargo per day per vessel. With several vessels worked, discharge rates in excess of 6,000 tons per day are possible.

During peak periods, Port Authority monitors vessel performance. Poorly performing vessel can be shifted to alternate berths or removed to anchorage. There are plans to construct a bulk-handling facility with work recently started.
The general cargo sheds are adequately equipped. Several stevedoring firms own and operate stevedoring equipment including gantry cranes, forklifts, tractors and trailers. Only companies that are wholly Djibouti owned are allowed to operate vessel stevedoring services.

Shipping lines offers 15 to 30 day's free time, after which demurrage applies. Port offers 30 days free time after which container is moved to Inland Free Port area where storage charges apply. Due to space limitations and demands on container handling equipment, only limited number containers can be stripped at port for despatch to Ethiopia. Where many containers are expected (say in excess of 50 boxes), arrangements can be made with port to block stack these containers. Stripping inside Ethiopia requires ETH Customs confirmation that box has been re-exported out of Ethiopia. Good coordination with transporters key to ensuring boxes are returned to Djibouti. Containers typically have payloads in excess of 20 Mtn. Transport of a large number of containers to Ethiopia requires enough draw bar type trucks that can move 2 TEU of 20 MT each.Ethiopia

Thailand top new and used car 4x4 vigo triton exporter to EthiopiaSituated in eastern Africa, Ethiopia (formerly called Abyssinia) has an area of approximately 1,127,127 sq km (435,186 sq mi), with a length of 1,639 km (1,018 mi) E–W and a width of 1,577 km (980 mi) N–S. Comparatively, the area occupied by Ethiopia is slightly less than twice the size of the state of Texas. It is bounded on the N by Eritrea, on the NE by Djibouti, on the E and SE by Somalia, on the S by Kenya, and on the W by Sudan, with a total boundary length of 5,328 km (3,311 mi). The Ogaden region of eastern Ethiopia is claimed by Somalia and has been the subject of sporadic military conflict between the two nations since 1961; the southeastern boundary has never been demarcated. Ethiopia's capital city, Addis Ababa, is located near the center of the country.

The vehicle must be Left Hand Drive. Ethiopia's import duties average ??  per cent and range from a low of 2 per cent to a high of 32 per cent.  Ethiopia also applies other duties and charges such as /service centers in Bissau, although service and parts availability for those models are patchy. Maintenance and repair facilities are limited both in expertise and availability of parts.

It is best to acquire a four-wheel-drive or some other type of sturdy vehicle with high ground clearance and heavy duty suspension for safety reasons, given the poor road conditions within and outside the city. You should order air, oil, and fuel filters; spark plugs; spare tires and inner tubes; extra windshield wipers; plus all required extra supplies and parts along with your vehicles as they will not be available easily once the vehicle is in.

Leaded gasoline and diesel fuel are reliably available in the capital and generally available in country’s interior. Because octane ratings are not high, the performance of engines designed for premium gasoline may suffer. Unleaded gasoline is not available, so catalytic converters should be removed before shipping vehicles to Guinea-Bissau. Although diesel fuel and leaded gasoline cost roughly the same amount, better fuel efficiency makes diesel engines more economical and a better choice for up-country travel. Fuel theft is not uncommon, so a lockable gas cap is highly recommended.

Undercoating, undercarriage protection, heavy-duty suspensions, and off-road packages are practical options for Eritrea. Tubeless tires can be repaired in the capital city, but inner tubes are recommended for up-country travel. Spare parts can be hard to find. Include in your household effects a good supply of belts, filters, gaskets, hoses, headlights, windshield wipers, fuses, power-steering and brake fluids, spark plugs, a distributor, a condenser, and tires. For up-country travel, bring emergency equipment, such as a strong jack, spare tires, tire pumps, jumper cables, winch or tow ropes, first-aid kit, and racks.

When traveling outside the capital city, four-wheeled drive vehicles are advised because the roads are in disrepair. During the rainy season, many upcountry roads become impassable.

Eritrea does not have many paved roads, including those in the capital city. The remainder is constructed of lateritic soils. These roads are often rough, and in poorly drained areas become impassable quagmires during the 6-month rainy season. In addition, the coastal salt air attacks car finishes, radiators, air-conditioning systems, and the chassis. For these reasons, simple, rugged automobiles, rust proofed and undercoated, and with good ground clearance are recommended.

Heavy-duty springs and shock absorbers are mandatory for up-country travel, as is air-conditioning to provide relief from heat, humidity, and dust. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended. Unleaded gas is not available in Eritrea. Catalytic converters must be removed before shipment or after arrival here.

 

文章From:http://www.szdtruck.com/te_news_industry/2009-11-17/2181.chtml